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Then and Now:

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Then & Now, Roland Ave.

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Looking east along University Parkway from the top of the Roland Water Tower, 1913. The two houses in the foreground are 830 and 900 W. University Parkway (the latter closer to the photographer). The no. 29 trolley route, opened on October 8, 1908, features prominently in this photo, running immediately parallel to the westbound carriageway of the parkway. The trolley passenger shelter pictured in set 17, below, is on close inspection visible in this shot too, in the very center foreground. The three-part, connected building toward the top right of the photo is the Egenton Home, an orphanage that subsequently moved to New North Roland Park (see "northwest," set 1). In 1926, the building shown here was taken over by the Keswick Home for Incurables which, now with a modern building and the name Keswick Multi-Care, still occupies the site. (Photo source: Karen Lewand. 1989. North Baltimore: From Estate to Development. Baltimore, Md.: Baltimore City Dept. of Planning; Egenton map source: Bromley, 1914.) Click photos for larger images.

     
 
     
   

Roland Water Tower and Environs

     

Set 1

 

Mapped Scene:

In this detail taken from the 1915 Bromley map, we can see that Somerset Road does not yet extend to Roland Avenue, as it does now. Instead it turned south down what is now called Somerset Place. The area that is now what we may call the Somerset Road western extension was in 1915 still open land owned by the Roland Park Company. On this map, the water tower is labeled "Baltimore Water Tower." The red circle shows the photographer's position.


Map: Bromley, 1915.


 

 

Scene: Roland Water Tower, looking southwest from near intersection of Roland Avenue and University Parkway (and, now, Somerset Road, though this last did not exist when this photo was taken). The no. 29 streetcar line is in the foreground. Though popularly thought of as a Roland Park landmark in the 21st century, the tower in fact never provided water to Roland Park; it served the Hampden area. The tower designed in 1903 by William J. Fizone and built in 1904-05.


Orig. caption: "City Water Tower Near Roland Park."


Date: June 1911.


Photographer:
George B. Simmons.


Source: A Book of Pictures in Roland Park.

 

 

Commentary: The tower itself is still instantly recognizable, though close inspection reveals it to be in sadly neglected condition. It ceased to be a functioning water tower in 1930 when the city moved to using reservoirs exclusively for its water supply. The tower has received inadequate municipal attention since then. Though the windows around the structure give the building the appearance of a lighthouse with rooms inside it, in fact the walls simply surround a tall 211,000-gallon water tank. Around the tank winds a spiral staircase, by which means people once accessed the viewing platform at the top.


Date: May 2009.


Photographer: D.P. Munro.

         
 
         

Set 2

 

 

Scene: Roland Water Tower loop, looking northwest from Roland Avenue. The photo is undated but can be placed with some precision. The standard trolley on the right is the no. 24 from Lakeside. The trackless trolley — that is, the bus powered by overhead lines — is the no. 10. The no. 10 line had once been served by a tracked streetcar that came up through Hampden and went as far north as the Roland Park Car House. In April 1940, the line was switched to trackless. From this point onward, the northern turning point of the route was the water tower, as the Civic League would not agree to having trackless trolleys in Roland Park because they needed power lines in addition to those that powered the regular streetcars. The no. 24 trolley had previously shuttled between Lakeside (at Lake Roland) and the car house. As of 1940, the no. 24 went further south, to the water tower to make the connection with the trackless no. 10. However, as of June 1947, with a new gasoline bus service to Roland Park, the no. 24 was restricted to a short run between Lakeside and Lake Avenue. This shot must therefore have been taken between 1940 and 1947.


Orig. caption: None.


Date: Unknown but between April 1940 and June 1947.


Photographer:
Unknown.


Source: Anthony F. Pinto III collection.

 

 

Commentary: When the vintage photo at left was taken in the 1940s, the water tower had already been abandoned for over a decade. By the early 21st century, it had fallen into disrepair to the point of endangering passersby, so frequently did tiles and other debris fall from it. In early summer 2009, Baltimore City surrounded the tower with a chain-link fence to keep pedestrians out of harm's way. The fence is evident in the modern photo above. Besides this, the scene is little changed. The streetcar rails have gone, as have the shelter and overhead power lines. The stone semicircular bench is still in place. (It is present in the old photo, but partially hidden by the conductor of the no. 24 trolley.) The apartment building in the background appears to be identical.


Date: March 2010.


Photographer: D.P. Munro.

         
 
         
Set 3
 

 

Scene: The photographer is looking northeast from southern leg of the horseshoe-shaped loop around the base of the water tower (which is to say from the position of the people boarding the trackless trolley in the previous set, set 2). The road in the immediate foreground is the 4200 block of Roland Avenue, immediately south of its intersection with University Parkway. The building just visible in the background through the foliage behind the trolley is the old Marianist Building at 4301 Roland Avenue, demolished in October 2009. The photo is undated but is datable to the seven-year period 1940 to 1947. Only between these dates did the no. 24 venture this far south down Roland Avenue, for reasons described in set 2.


Orig. caption: "Car #5388. Route 24 to Lakeside."


Date: Unknown but between April 1940 and June 1947.


Photographer:
Unknown.


Source: Leslie Goldsmith collection.

 

 

Commentary: This is one of the very few images in this series where the old photo shows more mature trees than the new photo. The apartment building prominent on the right of the photo above (988 W. University Parkway) is virtually identical in external appearance as in the old photo.


Date: May 2009.


Photographer: D.P. Munro.

         
 
         
Set 4
 

 

Scene: This photo was taken a couple of hundred yards north of the previous photo (set 3), the photographer here being just south of the set back court that makes up the bulk of the even-numbered side of the 4300 block of Roland Avenue. The building on the opposite side of the street, on the far right of the photo, is the now demolished Marianist Building, 4301 Roland Avenue.

The no. 29 line was laid in 1908 and closed in 1947; from Charles Street, it ran along University Parkway and up to the Roland Park Car House, which was behind the Tudor-style shopping center. Baltimore ordered this model of streetcar in 1936, so this photo must have been taken between that year and the closing of the no. 29 line a decade later.

This same car, no. 7023, is featured in a 1936-dated secondary photo in set 40 of this site's "west" section, with the same sign on the front. This being the case, this photo (above) was probably taken at about the same time, quite possibly the same day.


Orig. caption: "7023 — Baltimore’s first PCC car. Even though BTC’s PCC car numbers started at 7001, car 7023 became the first to run in Baltimore. Here car 7023 poses for a publicity photo on Roland Avenue in Roland Park. Strangely, the St. Louis cars never ran there in regular service." [The BTC was the Baltimore Transit Company and the term "St. Louis cars" refers to the fact that this model of trolley was made by the St. Louis Car Company. The PCC (Presidents' Conference Committee) streetcar was revolutionary for its day. — Ed.]


Date: Unknown but probably 1936.


Photographer:
Unknown.


Source: The Live Wire.

 

 

Commentary: This modern photo is largely unintelligible because the distinctive building visible beyond the streetcar in the old photo does not appear in the new shot, above, having been demolished in 2009. However, the sense-of-the-scene photo immediately below gives an idea. This is the Marianist building, as photographed in early 2008, 18 months before its demise. The photographer is standing in approximately the same spot as the streetcar photographer. In 1926, the Marianist Province of the United States, a Catholic religious order, constructed an imposing building on this site, 4301 Roland Avenue. Bought by a developer in the 2008, the old building was demolished in October 2009, to be replaced by a new memory-care facility. The building before its demolition is shown immediately below.


Date: December 2009.


Photographer: D.P. Munro.

 

 

Date: January 2008.

Photographer: Unknown (found on the Internet).

         
 
         
Set 5

 

Mapped Scene:

The Roland Park Woman's Club shows clearly on the 1915 Bromley map. Note that Plat 4, opposite Roland Avenue from the orphanage, is still described as vacant Roland Park Co. land.


Map: Bromley, 1915.

 

 

Scene: The Roland Park Woman's Club building sits on the northwest corner of the three-way intersection of Roland Avenue, Cold Spring Lane and Ridgewood Road. The photographer is looking at the building from the southeast corner of the intersection.


Orig. caption: "Womans Club, Roland Park, Md."


Date: Unknown but after 1904. Beyond the clubhouse, the photo shows 4502 Roland Avenue, which was constructed in 1904.


Photographer:
Unknown.


Source: Undated postcard; webmaster's collection.

 

 

Commentary: Few photos illustrate better than this the major thoroughfares that Roland Avenue and Cold Spring Lane have become. The photo to the left is undated, but is quite early. Depending on the source of the information, the club building was erected some time between 1901 and 1904, the club itself having been founded in 1898. The photo on the left was taken after 1904 but before the addition of the clubhouse's south wing, which occurred in the 1920s. In the old photo, Roland Avenue is still unpaved, as it was until some time after the city annexed this part of Baltimore County in late 1918.


Date: December 2009.


Photographer: D.P. Munro.

         
 
         
Set 6
 

 

Scene: A closer shot of the Woman's Club, looking northwest. The south wing is absent.


Orig. caption: "Roland Park Womans Club — 1904."


Date: 1904.


Photographer:
Unknown.


Source: Roland Park Revisited.

 

 

Commentary: The Woman's Club building has been substantially enlarged since opening its doors well over a century ago. Though it is hidden by foliage in this shot, the south wing prominent in the 1930s photo above and right now has a second floor added. The portico has been enclosed. The club itself still exists. Membership is by invitation only.


Date: December 2009.


Photographer: D.P. Munro.

         
   

 

Scene: The same scene as above, but taken about three decades later. The south wing has by now been added, though its second floor is still in the distant future.


Orig. caption: "Womans Club, Roland Park, Baltimore, Md."

Date: 1930s. The card has no publication date, but the postmark is dated July 27, 1938.


Photographer:
Hugh Gwynn.


Source: Undated postcard published by Morgan & Millard, Inc., Baltimore, Md.; Leslie Goldsmith collection.

 

Most of the postcards reproduced on this web site carry no messages, However, the 1930s one on the left does and it may interest viewers to read it:

"Dear Chum,

"So sorry, old dear, but Annie & I are going to A.P. this week-end — otherwise we would have been there with bells on, to say nothing of shorts — Love, Alice."

The postcard is addressed to a Miss Mary Settle, Sherwood Forest, Maryland.

If any reader knows who Alice, Annie or Mary may have been, please contact the webmaster.

And what is the mysterious "A.P."?

         
 
         
Set 7

 

Mapped Scene:

This is a close up of a section of the 1898 Bromley map. The orphanage is shown in some detail, including the driveway so prominent in the photo at right. Some time after this map was made, but before 1915 Bromley map's publication, the orphanage lot appears to have expanded to the east to encompass Mrs. Hanson's land and to the west to encompass the vacant lot abutting Roland Avenue.


Map: Bromley, 1898.

 

 

Scene: St. Mary's Female Orphan Asylum operated from 1818 to 1960. Its ultimate location was on a generous lot that, in its final and largest incarnation, was apparently bounded by Roland Avenue, Cold Spring Lane, Kittery Lane, and the back yards of the Somerset Road houses. Here, the unknown photographer is facing south and is at the orphanage's main entrance on Cold Spring, opposite Church Lane (the alley between Roland Avenue and Woodlawn Road, the latter then called Freyer or Fryer Avenue).


Orig. caption: None.


Date: Unknown but probably about 1900.


Photographer:
Unknown.


Source: Daughters of Charity collection.

 

 

Commentary: The anonymous photographer of the historic scene at left stood just about exactly where the tree is in the middle of this modern picture. Cold Spring Lane is in the foreground. The orphanage complex has now been reincarnated as the Roland Springs Community, of which development this is the northwest corner. A hundred and four townhouses constitute Roland Springs, the houses having been erected between 1974 and 1989. There is now not even a trace of the orphanage.


Date: December 2009.


Photographer: D.P. Munro.

         
 
         

Set 8

 

Mapped Scene:

The patio or deck upon which the girls in the photo at right are standing is clearly shown on this map (above) as a yellow square (which may indicate its having been built over by this time). By 1938, when the U.S. Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation Service did its aerial survey of Baltimore, the deck had certainly been built, or at least roofed, over (below). It was still roofed over at the time of the 1953 ASCS aerial survey, and so presumably remained so until the orphanage was closed in 1960.


Map: Bromley, 1915.

Photo: ASCS, 1938.

 

 

Scene: St. Mary's orphanage had a large patio or deck behind it, to its east (upon which, toward the end of the orphanage's tenure, the young residents used to roller skate). The 1900 Maryland orphanage census listed St. Mary's as having 225 girls, which is rather more than the group shown here (about 160). The photographer is looking east here and is probably looking out of a second floor window at the rear of the orphanage building itself (shown in set 7). The photo is undated but, judging by the late Victorian clothing, is in all likelihood circa 1900. Aerial photos of Baltimore taken in 1938 show this patio to have been roofed or perhaps even built over by the 1930s, so this shot certainly predates that. The ridge visible in the distant background is the area that will soon become Whitfield and Rugby roads.


Orig. caption: None.


Date: Unknown but probably about 1900.


Photographer:
Unknown.


Source: Daughters of Charity collection.

 

 

Commentary: Because of the complete absence today of even a hint of the ghost of the orphanage on the modern Roland Springs property, it is difficult to match the exact location of the historic photo to the left. However, a review of period and modern aerial photos shows that the main orphanage building (see set 7) stood on the site of the block behind the photographer in this new shot. The grassy swath evident at left must have been about where this parking lot is, putting the patio on the location of the townhomes shown here.


Date: October 2009.


Photographer: D.P. Munro.

         
 
         

Set 9

 

Mapped Scene:

The Industrial Home was located on a lot just north of the Melvale gas tank, which still exists.The 1953 ASCS aerial photo, below, shows the Industrial Home and the gas tank clearly.

Map: Matthews, 1935.

Photo: ASCS, 1953.

 

 

Scene: St. Mary's orphanage was not the only such institution in the vicinity. A little over a mile to the west along Cold Spring Lane lay a reform school called the Industrial Home for Colored Girls, a segregated facility that was supposed to train its residents for vocational jobs (hence the lugubrious name). The home was founded in 1882 as a tax-exempt private facility, changing its name to the Maryland Training School for Colored Girls when absorbed by the state in 1931. It was renamed again in 1949 as the Barrett School for Girls, and was merged with the Montrose School for Girls in 1962. The buildings pictured above were demolished sometime thereafter.


Orig. caption: "Industrial Home."


Date: Unknown.


Photographer:
Unknown.


Source: "A Timeline of Benevolent Giving," Maryland State Archives.

 

 

Commentary: The Industrial Home was not as large as St. Mary's orphanage but it was not small either. In 1916, it had 111 residents. In addition, there were seven staff members. The institution's funding originally having been a gift of George M. Griffith, six trustees were appointed by the Griffith estate, two by the city, and two by the state. In 1916, younger girls received two hours of schooling a day; older girls, one hour. For the rest of the time they worked in a nearby factory. The home had a playground, though it is not known where. Nor is it known when the home was demolished, but it was probably shortly after it merged with the Montrose School in 1962, for this was also the time that Cold Spring Lane was greatly widened to accommodate traffic coming off the new Jones Falls Express. The site is now occupied by the Calvert Wholesale Florist (left) and its hothouse (right).


Date: December 2009.


Photographer: D.P. Munro.

         
 
         
   

Plat 5 County

         

Set 10

 

Mapped Scene:

The barn or shed in the foreground of the Simmons photo may be the northernmost of the three shown on the tract belonging to the City & Suburban Realty and Investment Co. This map predates the photo by 13 years, so it does not yet show any development on Plat 5. The prominent 305 Somerset Road will be built in about the position of the ampersand before "Invest. Co." The road immediately to the east (right) of Mrs. Hanson's "Wilton" property is Kittery Lane.

Map: Bromley, 1898.

 

 

Scene: This scene is essentially the opposite of that shown in set 8. Here, the photographer is looking west from the soon-to-be Rugby Road area toward Roland Park's Plat 5 (County), still at this stage under construction. The water tower is plainly visible. The housing being built at the top right of the photo is Merryman Court. Behind this mini-development, just beyond the tree line, is the St. Mary's orphanage pyramid-topped tower (see set 7). The arched structure just to the left of the tree the middle of the picture is the back terrace of 305 Somerset Road.


Orig. caption: "General view of new section on University Parkway, showing roads and houses under construction. Looking west from a site between Rugby Road and Charles Street. Note Merryman Court under construction, vacant Northfield Place (right), 305 Somerset under construction (left of center tree), water tower (left), and tip of St. Mary's Orphanage tower (far right at tree line)."


Date: June 1911.


Photographer:
George B. Simmons.


Source: A Book of Pictures in Roland Park.

 

 

Commentary: Now the 4300 block of Rugby Road, this part of Guilford was developed by the Roland Park Co. in the late 1920s. While the Plat 5 scene of the historic photo is largely unchanged to this day, it is now entirely hidden by the houses on Rugby Road and the trees that have grown up in the Stony Run valley over the course of a century. This new photo's only point of reference with the old photo is the Roland Water Tower, visible in the distance in both shots (to the left of the foreground chimney in the new picture).


Date: December 2009.


Photographer: D.P. Munro.

         
 
         

Set 11

 

Mapped Scene:

As this close up of part of the 1911 Roland Park Co. map of Plat 5 shows, at this time, Keswick Road was not a through road to Cold Spring. It ended at Somerset Road, the little section north of that being considered to be part of Northfield Place.

 

Map: Roland Park Co., 1911.

 

 

Scene: The photographer is standing on the road looking north toward the south-facing front of 308 Northfield Place. Immediately behind the row of houses of which 308 is a part is the northern boundary of Plat 5, which separates this part of Roland Park from the separate Keswick neighborhood. Through the 1920s, northbound Keswick Road came to a dead end at Northfield Place, not connecting with Keswick Road north of Cold Spring Lane (which was called Cedar Avenue in Evergreen and Notre Dame Avenue in Plat 1, later Forest Road). In 1931, the city mandated that the Roland Park Co. extend Keswick Road north through the Keswick neighborhood so as to create a through road for emergency vehicles. The photo above is undated but tax records give a 1925 completion date for this house, which was designed by Mottu & White in 1922.


Orig. caption: "308 Northfield under Construction."


Date: Circa 1924-25.


Photographer:
Unknown.


Source: Four Walking Tours.

 

 

Commentary: The tree whose boughs dominate the top left of this frame precludes an exact matching of the historic photo's angle. Nevertheless, the new photo above shows well enough how 308 Northfield eventually turned out.


Date: December 2009.


Photographer: D.P. Munro.

         
 
         

Set 12

 

Back View:

From this terrace at the back of the house, 305 Somerset commands a spectacular view of the Stony Run valley.

Photo: Same as photo at right.

 

 

Scene: The photographer is looking southeast at 305 Somerset Road, one of the most distinctive buildings in Roland Park. Built on a multiple lots, in these early years, it was owned by Charles H. Dickey.


Orig. caption: "House at Roland Park, Md. Howard Sill, Architect."


Date: Probably 1912.


Photographer:
Unknown.


Source: The Brickbuilder, vol. 21, no. 9; Anthony F. Pinto III collection. [The magazine is undated, but volume 21 was almost certainly the volume for 1912 because an issue of volume 13 covered the 1904 Baltimore fire. — Ed.]

 

 

Commentary: Despite the passage of a century since the historic photo was taken, the exterior of 305 Somerset appears wholly unchanged.


Date: March 2010.


Photographer: D.P. Munro.

         
 
         

Set 13

 

 

Mapped Scene:

The exquisitely detailed 1911 Roland Park Co. map shows that nos. 305 and 307 Somerset Road were by 1911 bought and built. Many other lots, however, were still empty at this time.

Map: Roland Park Co., 1911.

 

 

Scene: The photographer is looking south at 307 Somerset Road, which is immediately next to 305 Somerset, the subject of set 12, above. Any garage, let alone a double garage, was highly unusual in Roland Park at this time.


Orig. caption: "House at Roland Park, Md. Howard Sill, Architect."


Date: Probably 1912.


Photographer:
Unknown.


Source: The Brickbuilder, vol. 21, no. 9; Anthony F. Pinto III collection.

 

 

Commentary: Like 305, next-door 307 Somerset — designed by the same architect as 305 — has entirely retained its historical appearance since 1912.


Date: March 2010.


Photographer: D.P. Munro.

         
 
         

Set 14

 

Mapped Scene:

In this section of the 1915 Bromley map, Merryman Court is very apparent. There is no through road to Cold Spring Lane. Keswick Road changes its name to Northfield Place north of Somerset Road and turns right at Merryman. Beyond, the future Keswick neighborhood is still the Carter estate.

Map: Bromley, 1915.

 

 

Scene: Here we are looking west at the newly constructed Merryman Court. Workmen's tools can be seen in the foreground on the right. Nowadays, Keswick Road cuts through this debris-strewn area but until 1931 it dead-ended here. This was a deliberate Roland Park Co. ploy: the company did not wish any future inhabitants of what is now the Keswick neighborhood to have easy access to Roland Park. At this time, 1912, the Keswick neighborhood had not yet been developed and the area was still the Allan L. Carter estate.


Orig. caption: "Group of houses, Merryman Court, Roland Park, Md. Howard Sill, Architect."


Date: Probably 1912.


Photographer:
Unknown.


Source: The Brickbuilder, vol. 21, no. 9; Anthony F. Pinto III collection.

 

 

Commentary: The idea behind Merryman Court, where six houses surround a common "green," was to suggest an old English close, according to Roberta Moudry. This allowed Roland Park Co. President Edward H. Bouton to experiment with the notion of houses being a part of a larger theme. There is only one entrance to Merryman Court, the gateway shown here, which shielded the mini-development from the outside world.


Date: March 2010.


Photographer: D.P. Munro.

         
 
         

Set 15

 

Period Plan:

This Merryman Court plan, from the Brickbuilder architectural journal, shows the six houses of the court and their common open area, "the green."

Source: Same as photo at right.

 

 

Scene: This photo, which is part of the same set as that shown at set 14, shows the two east-facing houses of the six in Merryman Court, backing onto Kittery Lane.


Orig. caption: "Group of houses, Merryman Court, Roland Park, Md. Howard Sill, Architect."


Date: Probably 1912.


Photographer:
Unknown.


Source: The Brickbuilder, vol. 21, no. 9; Anthony F. Pinto III collection.

 

 

Commentary: Moudry cites Edward L. Palmer, Jr. as the designer of Merryman Court, while the contemporary Brickbuilder journal named Howard Sill. Sill was a protegé of the Wyatt & Nolting firm, which had designed such Roland Park mainstays as the first country club building and the Roland Avenue shopping center. Palmer initially worked for Hornblower & Marshall, which worked extensively with the Roland Park Co. on all five of its principal developments (Roland Park, Guilford, Homeland, Northwood and Dundalk). He went on to become the Roland Park Co.'s in-house architect. In 1917, he went into private practice.


Date: March 2010.


Photographer: D.P. Munro.

         
 
         
Set 16
 

 

Scene: This house is at the northwest corner of Overhill and Keswick roads.


Orig. caption: "The house of Mrs. Charles E. Dohme on 11 Overhill Road at Roland Park in Baltimore which was included in the F. Heath Coggins book Attractive Homes of People Prominent in Maryland. Mrs. Dohme was the widow of the vice president of the Sharp and Dohme pharmaceutical company (later Merck, Sharp and Dohme). The impressive steps of the front entrance are seen in this photo."


Date: 1928.


Photographer:
Unknown.


Source: Baltimore County Public Library.

 

 

Commentary: Apart from a change of address designation (the property is now 400 Overhill Road), the house has changed virtually none since 1928 — most gratifying.


Date: November 2009.


Photographer: D.P. Munro.

         
 
         
   

Plat 5 City and Beyond

         
Set 17

 

Mapped Scene:

In this detail from a 1911 Roland Park Co. map of Plat 5, the trolley stop is clearly marked — as is the old city/country boundary, which in fact passed just a few feet south of the shelter. This was the city line until New Year's Eve, 1918.

Map: Roland Park Co., 1911.

 

 

Scene: The photographer is looking southeast along the eastbound lane of University Parkway, near the old streetcar shelter opposite intersection with Overhill Road (visible on the far left). The streetcar tracks are plainly visible between the low privet hedges. Below Overhill (i.e., east of the shelter), the the tracks are separated from University Parkway westbound by a wire fence as well as a privet hedge. Above the shelter (i.e., toward the photographer), a hedge alone suffices.


Orig. caption:"Views of parking spaces between boulevards and trolley waiting stations on University Parkway. University Parkway and Overhill Road looking southeast." [The first part of the caption applies to the photo below too. — Ed.]


Date: June 1911.


Photographer:
George B. Simmons.


Source: A Book of Pictures in Roland Park.

 

 

Commentary: This scene is still pleasingly recognizable. The median, bereft of its trolley tracks, is narrower but still verdant. The Overhill streetcar shelter is much the same, though its walls have been considerably lowered.


Date: May 2009.


Photographer: D.P. Munro.

         
 
         

Set 18

 

Mapped Scene:

The second trolley shelter on University Parkway is also shown on the 1911 Roland Park Co. Plat 5 map.

Map: Roland Park Co., 1911

 

 

Scene: From a point about a quarter of a mile southeast of his position in the previous photo (set 17), the photographer is now looking northwest along the short S-bend that links the otherwise non-aligned sections of Keswick Road in Plat 5 City and Plat 5 County. The wire fence between the tracks and the road is very obvious here.


Orig. caption: "Views of parking spaces between boulevards and trolley waiting stations on University Parkway. Keswick Road and University Parkway looking northwest. Note trolley tracks and auto." [The first part of the caption applies to the photo above too. — Ed.]


Date: June 1911.


Photographer:
George B. Simmons.


Source: A Book of Pictures in Roland Park.

 

 

Commentary: Though there are more trees about than a century ago, this oddly shaped section of road is almost exactly the same as it was. It is of course now paved, unlike in the old photo. Though one cannot really tell it from either photo of this set, the sidewalk at left is still paved with the same salmon-colored bricks. The trolley shelter is now long gone; the foreground holly bush obscures its old site from view here. The house visible at the extreme left of the old photo is 803 E. University Parkway, though this, too, is obscured by trees in the new photo.


Date: December 2009.


Photographer: D.P. Munro.

         
 
         

Set 19

 

Mapped Scene:

The 1911 Roland Park Co. Plat 5 map shows 719 W. University as bought and built. The gap to its left is Kittery Lane, a pre-existing right of way that the Roland Park Co. had to work around.

Map: Roland Park Co., 1911.

 

 

Scene: This undated and anonymous photo shows 719 W. University Parkway being constructed. The tax records give this building's date as 1913, so presumably this is about the year of this photo.


Orig. caption: None.


Date: Circa 1913.


Photographer:
Unknown.


Source: Anthony F. Pinto III collection.

 

 

Commentary: The house, remarkably well preserved, is to this day one of University Parkway's signature buildings.


Date: March 2010.


Photographer: D.P. Munro.

         
 
         
Set 20
 

 

Scene: The photographer is more or less level with the trolley station shown in set 17 and is looking along eastbound University Parkway at the innovative poured-concrete, five-house complex on the 800 block of the parkway. Built on Plat 5 lots 137, 138 and 139, these were the first poured-concrete houses in Baltimore.


Orig. caption: "Block of five concrete houses on University Parkway."


Date: June 1911.


Photographer:
George B. Simmons.


Source: A Book of Pictures in Roland Park.

 

 

 

Commentary: The concrete building, nos. 835-843 W. University, is just about exactly the same as it was a century ago. And there is still a fire hydrant in the same position. The big change, of course, is the presence above of the gray building on the right, 845 E. University, itself the end unit of a triplex (845-849 E. University). This latter was built, according to tax records, in 1915, four years after the Simmons photo was taken.


Date: May 2009.


Photographer: D.P. Munro.

 

         
 
         
Set 21

 

Aerial View:

Though overexposed, this 1938 ASCS aerial view shows the poured concrete multiplex on University Parkway well. Also visible are the Roland Park Country School at its post-1916 location on 40th Street, where Roland Park Place is now (2010). The Keswick Home for Incurables' old campus buildings can be seen too (Keswick Multi-Care, as it is now known, is at present housed in modern buildings on the same site).

Photo: ASCS, 1938.

 

 

Scene: In this scene, the photographer is on the north side of University Parkway, looking south toward the same concrete-house block as shown in the previous set (set 20). The streetcar tracks feature prominently in the foreground.


Orig. caption: "Block of five concrete houses, showing parking space."


Date: June 1911.


Photographer:
George B. Simmons.


Source: A Book of Pictures in Roland Park.

 

 

Commentary: Though the trees in front of 835-843 E. University are now sufficiently grown as to partially shield the building from view from the opposite side of the parkway, the scene is nevertheless instantly recognizable.


Date: March 2010.


Photographer: D.P. Munro.

         
 
         
Set 22
 

 

Scene: The photo in the previous set (set 21) was in all probability taken looking over the fence prominent in this photo. Here, the photographer has taken a few steps back and turned slightly to the right (west), giving us a view of the ornate gateway of this Georgian-style Plat 5 house.


Orig. caption: "View from front garden of a house on University Parkway."


Date: June 1911.


Photographer:
George B. Simmons.


Source: A Book of Pictures in Roland Park.

 

 

Commentary: Rather surprisingly, given a century of tree growth, the concrete complex on the other side of University Parkway is more visible in this newer photo than in the old.


Date: May 2009.


Photographer: D.P. Munro.

         
 
         
Set 23
 

 

Scene: This is the house to which belongs the gateway shown in the previous set, a circa 1910 Georgian on W. University Parkway. The photographer is standing in approximately the same place as in the previous set, but has turned to his right. This house was designed by Palmer, Willis & Lamdin, architects.


Orig. caption: "Front view of a house in the preceding group." [The "preceding" group mentioned in this caption is in fact shown in the set below this one, set 24. — Ed.]


Date: March 1911.


Photographer:
George B. Simmons.


Source: A Book of Pictures in Roland Park.

 

 

Commentary: Other than the fact that the shutters are cream colored now instead of black, this fine and stately house on the 800 block of W. University Parkway is not much changed.


Date: May 2009.


Photographer: D.P. Munro.

         
 
         
Set 24

 

Mapped Scene:

The 1911 Plat 5 map shows Centennial Park nicely (though it was not then called that), including the brick Kittery Lane footpath.

Map: Roland Park Co., 1911

 

 

Scene: This is the "preceding group" of houses mentioned in the historical caption of the previous set. The road at the right is Kittery Lane; its footpath extension across Centennial Park or The Dell is clearly shown. "Centennial Park" and "The Dell" are the names variously given to the green, landscaped area between east- and westbound University Parkway.


Orig. caption: "Group of colonial houses on University Parkway, showing gardens enclosed by brick walls — winter."


Date: March 1911.


Photographer:
George B. Simmons.


Source: A Book of Pictures in Roland Park.

 

 

Commentary: Nearly all the elements of the historic photo to the left are still in place — but all are now hidden by trees. The brick path that continues Kittery Lane across Centennial Park is still there — and paved with the same bricks too — but it is largely camouflaged in this autumnal modern shot. The stately Georgians that dominate the old photo are all present and correct behind the trees in this new picture. The lone sapling just to the right of center in the old photo has grown into the middle-distance tree immediately in front of and to the right of the bright red bush. Note the same distinctive split trunk. Likewise, in the old photo, toward the left are two white-barked trees growing from the same base, with a dark tree immediately this side of them. The dark tree has gone but the two light-barked trees are still alive and still growing from the same base. In the new photo, they are immediately to the left of the yellow rope with a broken swing dangling from the end.


Date: December 2009.


Photographer: D.P. Munro.

         
 
         
Set 25
 

 

Scene: This is another of the Georgians on the north side of University Parkway. This shot is particularly interesting because it clearly shows that, as late as 1911, Plat 5 was still not complete.


Orig. caption: "A colonial house — winter."


Date: March 1911.


Photographer:
George B. Simmons.


Source: A Book of Pictures in Roland Park.

 

 

Commentary: The fact that Plat 5 was far from complete in 1911 can hardly be missed in the old Simmons photo on the left. All alone in 1911, this W. University Parkway house is now surrounded by foliage and neighbors. Beyond that, it has changed little except that the hand rails on either side of the portico have been removed,


Date: May 2009.


Photographer: D.P. Munro.

         
 
         
Set 26

 

Mapped Scene:

This map was made before Roland Park's development of Plat 5, though it did own the land at this time. The Ma & Pa is here still the Baltimore & Leheigh. A large mill pond is still evident; the Linkwood Apartments are now at this spot. Mrs. Quigley's house is a far cry from the Carlyle Apartment building that will one day occupy her spot. The Keswick retirement community on 40th Street is here still the Egenton Orphan Asylum, which later moved to New North Roland Park. Shaded gray, Wyman Park is, however, already Wyman Park.

Map: Bromley, 1906.

 

 

Scene: The view is looking southward along Stony Run, which is flowing away from the photographer (to the left of the shot). The photographer is standing under the University Parkway viaduct. Puffing toward the photographer is a Ma & Pa engine heading north. The green space on either side of the locomotive is Wyman Park.


Orig. caption: "Engine #41 of the Maryland & Pennsylvania Railroad. It is running as the Baltimore switcher at University Parkway underpass, taking cars up to the Homeland siding."


Date: 1951.


Photographer:
James P. Gallagher.


Source: Baltimore County Public Library.

 

 

Commentary: There is little to say. Other than the lack of tracks and the fact that the concrete streambed has deteriorated somewhat, the immediate scene is similar. In the background, the once sylvan west bank of the stream has been cleared and turned into playing fields.


Date: May 2009.


Photographer: D.P. Munro.

         
 
         
Set 27

Aerial View:

This 1938 ASCS photo shows the University Parkway viaduct and the Ma & Pa line running under it. The high-rise apartment buildings that now crowd this area are of course absent.

Photo: ASCS, 1938.

 

 

 

Scene: This photo, perhaps 10 to 20 years older than that in set 26, shows a derailment under the University Parkway viaduct. Here, the photographer is north of the bridge looking south. Derailments were fairly common, especially on down inclines, as here. (On down inclines, the tension between the cars is lost because of gravity.)


Orig. caption: "University Parkway."


Date: Unknown but probably 1930s.


Photographer:
Warren Olt.


Source: MDRails.com.

 

 

Commentary: The graffiti are new and the tracks and the utility pole have gone. But that's about it. There is no mistaking this scene, even decades later. The three protruding drainpipes are still in place.


Date: December 2009.


Photographer: D.P. Munro.

 

         
 
         
Set 28
 

 

Scene: This is the same scene as shown in set 27, though shot from the south side of the University Parkway viaduct looking northward.


Orig. caption: "University Parkway."


Date: Unknown but probably 1930s.


Photographer:
Warren Olt.


Source: MDRails.com.

 

 

Commentary: In December 2009, when this modern photo was taken, the city was in the middle of a massive stream-restoration project along this part of Stony Run (having undertaken the restoration of the upstream Plat 1 section in 2006).


Date: December 2009.


Photographer: D.P. Munro.

         
 
         

Set 29

 

Mapped Scene:

This map is a detail from a 1912 map made by the Roland Park Co. of its soon-to-be Guilford development. The map shows a vacant lot at the cathedral site. Even if ground had been broken in 1910 (see right), apparently serious building did not commence until 1912-13.

 

Map: Roland Park Co., 1912.

 

 

Scene: Looking west from the eastern edge of the "wedge" at the southernmost end of Guilford. The Episcopal Diocese bought 3.6 acres here in 1910, breaking ground that same year.


Orig. caption: "Workers collected their wages at this payline at the Guilford development site. Construction of the Protestant Episcopal Cathedral foundation had begun. February 28, 1913."


Date: February 28, 1913.


Photographer:
Unknown.


Source: North Baltimore: From Estate to Development.

 

 

Commentary: Located a 4 E. University Parkway, the Episcopal Cathedral of the Incarnation was eventually completed in 1947, the work of many architects. At the time, there were great uncertainties. Forty years earlier, in 1907, the then-bishop had said that it might take from 100 to 200 years to get it built, according to the October 26, 1907 New York Times (click inset thumbnail).


Date: December 2009.


Photographer: D.P. Munro.

         
 
         

Set 30

 

Aerial View:

Aerial view of the Rotunda, then the home of the Maryland Casualty insurance firm, from an undated period advertising postcard. The street at the bottom left is Keswick Road.

Source: Undated postcard; Kilduffs.com.

 

 

Scene: The Rotunda on 40th Street. The Rotunda's corner stone was laid in 1920. The grounds — see aerial view at left — were designed by the Olmsteds, who had been so crucial in the designing of Roland Park plats 2 to 6.


Orig. caption: None.


Date: Unknown.


Photographer:
Unknown.


Source: Undated postcard; Kilduffs.com.

 

 

Commentary: In this modern photo, the formerly H-shaped Rotunda looks just about identical to the way it looked in the old photo at left. However, this is only because the large, blue "lease" sign hides the fact that the spaces between the vertical struts of the H have been filled in by a supermarket (west side) and a movie theater (east side).


Date: May 2009.


Photographer: D.P. Munro.

         
 
         

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